Neurology

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis is a debilitating neurological disease that is thought to be caused by destruction of the myelin sheaths (fatty protective insulation) around axons of the brain and spinal cord. Loss of myelin impacts the ability of these tissues to conduct signals and the inflammatory process can lead to scarring resulting in a broad range of symptoms. This myelin damage appears to be related primarily to an auto-immune dysfunction, but there also appears to be environmental and genetic factors involved. There is no known cure for the physical and cognitive defects associated with chronic Multiple Sclerosis. Many investigators are looking at using the regenerative properties of cell therapy to mitigate the impact of Multiple Sclerosis on the nervous system.

Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a disease characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakness, defects in muscle proteins (dystrophin concentration is greatly reduced), and the death of muscle cells and tissue. Diagnosis is based on muscle biopsy, laboratory evaluation (increased levels of creatine phosphokinase) and EMG findings. There are nine major types of MD and most types of MD are multi-system disorders with manifestations in body systems including the heart, gastrointestinal system, nervous system, endocrine glands, eyes and brain. MD has a strong genetic link. Treatment options are limited. There has been a keen interest in using stem cells to regenerate muscle tissue and there has been success in using human stem cells for MD in mice. There is hope that adipose derived stem cells may be effective in regenerating muscle damaged by MD.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

ALS also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease is a debilitating neurologic disease that results from the destruction of upper and lower motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. ALS is associated with rapidly progressive weakness, muscle wasting, spasticity, and difficulty breathing, swallowing and speaking. There is no known cause for ALS and genetics are implicated in only 5% of cases. There is no known cure for the physical defects associated with ALS. Many investigators are looking at using the regenerative properties of cell therapy to mitigate the impact of ALS on the nervous system.

Parkinsons

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that affects close to one million Americans.  PD is a chronic and progressive disorder, which is thought to be caused by the destruction of dopamine (an important neurotransmitter) that generates cells in the midbrain.  The cause of PD is unknown and there is no cure.  Treatment is focused on medication and management of symptoms. Current research include investigations into new animal models of the disease, and of the potential use of gene therapy, stem cell transplants and neuro-protective agents. There is hope that mesenchymal stem cells will mitigate some of the degenerative effects.

Stroke

Stroke, also known as cerebro-vascular accident, is caused by a disturbance in blood supply to the brain. Stroke affects millions of Americans every year. The result is ischemic brain injury which means that part of the brain has suffered from lack of oxygen and this has resulted in vital tissue destruction. Symptoms vary depending on the anatomic location of the event and extent and duration of the tissue loss. After acute management, long term healing must occur which requires management of swelling and neovascularization of damaged tissue. Researchers particularly in Europe have been actively studying the use of mesenchymal stem cells to help promote healing after ischemic brain injury.

 

Results from this or any other treatment cannot be guaranteed. Your stem cells are your body’s own ability to heal. Outcomes will vary from patient to patient.  Each potential patient must be assessed individually to determine the potential for optimum results from this regenerative therapy.  To learn more about stem cell therapy, please contact us by clicking here or calling our clinic at 604-708-CELL (604-708-2355).

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